Monthly Archives: October 2013

Author Interview with Alan Hardy

We bid a warm welcome to author Alan Hardy

Alan Hardy author of Gabriella Gabriella by Alan Hardy

I’m a director of an English language school for foreign students. Married, with one daughter. Poetry pamphlets: Wasted Leaves, 1996; I Went With Her, 2007. I’ve had poems published in such magazines as Orbis, Iota, The Interpreter’s House, Poetry Nottingham, Poetry Salzburg Review, Poetry Cornwall, and others. I have now written five novels. I would describe them as surreal novels exploring the nature of relationships, romantic and sexual, and Britain’s class-system, with liberal use of comedy and satire, creating original and riveting settings full of humour, romance, sex and adventure.

GABRIELLA:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gabriella-ebook/dp/B009H7SCMA
http://www.amazon.com/Gabriella-ebook/dp/B009H7SCMA
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/239576?ref=ebookspublisher

GOODREADS: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6549307
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/AlanWilliamHard
FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/alan.hardy.14268

Alan Hardy – Interview with Grey Wolf

1. How long have you been writing?

I’ve been writing prose (in a serious way) for about 6/7 years. Up till then I’d been writing poetry for more years than I care to remember (and am still writing it)

2. What is the earliest work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

My first published works were poems in magazines, and then of course a couple of my own poetry pamphlets. My first published novel was Gabriella (2013)

3. Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?

Maybe Oscar Wilde, and the Italian poet, Giacomo Leopardi.

4. Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?

Perfume by Patrick Süskind and Rain by Karen Duve, although not necessarily inspirational in the traditional sense, were 2 books I read about 6 years ago (translated into English from the German) and which were, if you like, the added spur to me to get writing novels. They are of course seminal works in modern novel-writing (their particular blend of surrealism, originality, tone, etc.)

5. Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

I think my writing is rather surreal, satirical and individualistic, so, although I’m sure particular places may well influence the setting of my stuff, I don’t think it’s tied to a particular time or place.

6. Which was the first book you published and why?

Apart from my poetry books, GABRIELLA was the first. I just felt I had to get something out there (I’ve got 4 others primed and ready to go). I picked on Gabriella because it was comic, cheeky, sexy, surreal, but maybe less complicated and shocking than some of the others. They’ll all be coming out soon…You have been warned.

7. Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

Some people have been a bit outraged by GABRIELLA. They’ve found it shocking, too erotic, etc., and one or two had to stop reading. That surprised me; the book is a bit cheeky, saucy and bawdy (rather like a sexy seaside postcard) but is quite harmless fun, and is, if anything, just an attack on the British class-system, of course at the same time using a fair bit of humour, bawdiness, etc.

8. Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?

Rigsby, Basil Fawlty

9. If you could go back in time to learn the truth about one historical mystery or disputed event what would it be?

Well, I’d love to go back to Greek-Roman times, or to Victorian times. Fascinating epochs. Specifically to have a particular event/mystery cleared up…well, maybe late Victorian times to discover the true identity of Jack the Ripper, and hope it was a member of the royal family

10. Why the name ‘Gabriella’ for your book?

I reckon it sounds both posh and sexy, so it fits the nature of the book, a bawdy satire on our class-ridden society.

11. How do you see the future of the ‘indie’ world?

There are thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of ‘indies’ milling around, liberated by the social media/publishing revolution from the exclusive straitjacket of traditional publishing, yet at the same time imprisoned within the resulting baffling, overcrowded marketplace. Indies are all fighting to gain a tiny foothold on the ladder of success, and are all dancing to the tune of the media/publishing giants of Amazon/FB/Twitter/GR/etc., and tweeting/FB-ing/reviewing/GR-listing/’liking’/etc. in a rather unhealthy frenzy of self-promotion. ..basically indulging in every form of social media brown-nosing yet invented…What each person is constrained to do is shout and scream as loudly as possible in the vain hope of being heard over and above the mass hubbub and din of all the other indies screaming and shouting as loudly as they can…I think one possible answer to this conundrum could be for indies to band/club together to produce anthologies/books under a writers’ collective banner, such that their group becomes a known ‘brand’ in the marketplace, and readers would be attracted to that brand, rather than to individual authors. I’ve taken part in such moves recently, for example with the group known as THE INDIE COLLABORATION, with its anthology TALES FROM DARK PLACES (see link below), and its forthcoming anthology entitled YULE TIDE TALES. This is a way of rationalizing the market, and authors achieving traction and recognition through being part of viable ‘mutual/cooperative’ units. Anyway, it’s an idea…

A WORLD OF POSSIBILITY:
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/335901
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18144783-a-world-of-possibility?ac=1

TALES FROM DARK PLACES:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tales-Places-Halloween-Collection-Collaboration-ebook/dp/B00G8P69B0
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/371354

Alan Hardy, Thank You very much!

Book Fair at Swansea Museum, Sat Nov 2nd 2013

Local History Book Fair
2nd November 2013
Swansea Museum from 10am

Come to Swansea Museum this Saturday and visit the Local History Book Fair, an annual event this year with 30+ stalls.

Among the stallholders are Llangiwg Church, community arts venue, and the history of Garth Farm, Rhydyfro near Pontardawe.

In addition, Grey Wolf will be there with the following:-

a) Phoenix of The Valley, my book of poetry and photographs of the Upper Swansea Valley, only £9.99

b) Len Ley’s history of industrialisation and the social impact thereof in the Upper Swansea Valley, ‘The Iron Cradle’, at £7.99

c) Details about the Quartet of local history websites,
Ystradgynlais History
Ystalyfera History
Ystradgynlais Wargraves
Ystalyfera Fallen

d) other works by Grey Wolf including
the poetry books Phoenix and Poeticus
the alternate history books Ten Naval Battles and How To Write Alternate History
samples of my novels and novellas including Never The Dawn and The Mailed Fist

Entry is free, and the Book Fair is open to the public 10am to 4pm

Best Regards
Grey Wolf

Contact Grey Wolf

Grey Wolf’s Blog runs both Author Interviews and offers Guest Blogging opportunities for other authors and those involved in the book creation and publicity sphere. Just email
enquiries@alternate-history-fiction.com
If you can head your email appropriately, eg “Request for Author Interview” then it will stand out from the crowd in the InBox and garner a swift response.
There are currently 2 or 3 vacancies for December, and then the majority of 2014 dates are free, so if you have a release, a promotion etc coming up, contact me and see if I can help.

Best Regards
Grey Wolf

Author Interview with A C Heller

We bid a warm welcome to author A C Heller

 author

My name is A.C. Heller. I was born and raised in Southern New Jersey. I currently live in Arizona and I am 27 years old. I have a full time job, aside from writing, and I like to consider myself a relatively sane human being.

Amazon Author profile:
http://www.amazon.com/A.C.-Heller/e/B00EFRDH5O/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1
Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ACHeller2013
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/ACHeller
Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/ACHeller

A C Heller – Interview with Grey Wolf

How long have you been writing?
I used to write a lot when I was younger. The angst of teenage years made for some pretty potent poetry that I am sorry I have lost over the years. But I started writing actual novels in May of 2013. I have always wanted to be an author but for a long time I saw it as one of those impossible life choices. Luckily for me I am rather technologically savvy so I quickly learned about ebooks and ran with it. With the support of my family, of course.

What is the earliest work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?
Fate is the earliest published piece.

Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?
I absolutely adore anything by Kristen Ashley, JD Nixon, and RL Mathewson.

Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?
Well, even though it is indirectly, I’d have to say Anne Rice and Stephen King. My mother is a HUGE reader. When I was growing up she would always have her nose in a book and then she would tell me about them. So the love of books was instilled in me at an early age. Like my fear of clowns… Thanks to IT…

How many books do you have written, and of those how many are already published, and how many will be?
I have written two novels so far. One (Fate) Is already published and (Chance) my second novel will be published in early November of this year. The Series I am writing was initially planned on being four books. Though now I am thinking there may be more.

Where did the inspiration for Fate come from?
The honest truth is video games. More specifically MMORPGS. I have played online games for years and yes I was one of those people who sat at their computers for hours on end “raiding”. One of the main games I used to play was super hero based and the character I choose to create was a ‘healer’. When I created her back story I decided to make her a Nephilim. And that is how Chasca the lead character is Fate was born.

Some writers hate the idea of a prologue, how do you see its advantages?
To me prologues are the perfect way to set the tone for a story. It gives the reader a quick insight into the story without randomly divulging too much information.

Were you happy with the general ebook pricing structure?
I’m a huge reader so I was very aware of the pricing structure. I can tell you that I have bought over 300 books on my Kindle and the prices generally range from .99 cents to 3.99. So I priced my book accordingly.

Do you intend to have a print version of Fate?
I do. Though it is completely dependent on how well my ebook sales are.

Do you identify with your heroine, or is she someone you might want to be/have been?
Yes, very much so. And I can say this easily because Chasca was originally meant to portray me on an online video game. So her characteristics are very similar to my own. With the exception of physical appearance.

Did the end come naturally, or did it take a lot of working out?
I would have to say it came easily. I will admit that when I write I do it off of the top of my head. I do very little pre-planning unless it is crucial.

Are sales going better than you expected?
That’s hard to answer. Fate has only been out since August of this year and sales are not through the roof but as a new author I never expected to be an over night success. And considering when I decided to pursue my dream I was making no money from book sales. So the fact that I am making any sales at all, is freaking fantastic.

Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?
Not particularly. It isn’t as it I look at a sunset and say “Go away stupid sun!” I am just more likely to notice how it effects the people around me as opposed to myself.

Which was the first book you published and why?
Fate was the first book I published. And well the easiest response to that is because I actually finished it! But that is always because I really enjoyed writing it. I am one of those see-something-shiny people. So if something bores me, my attention span has officially vacated the premises. So clearly Fate did it for me.

Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?
Surprised? No. Slightly wounded? Yes. After my first bad review, I actually walked around the house pouting for an hour or so. I’m logical enough to know that not everyone is going to like my work but having put so much of myself into it, naturally I feel it. This is something I hope with time, I’ll get over.

Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?
This is kind a broad spectrum answer but it’s the truth. Anyone who has the strength and perseverance to buckle down and pull through. Life is hard, and the world we live in makes it that much harder. So those who work hard, struggle but still refuse to give up are my heroes.

If you could go back in time to learn the truth about one historical mystery or disputed event what would it be?
That’s a hard one. There are so many! I would have to say Atlantis. The very concept that a (possibly mythological) historical city could simply vanish is amazing to me.

Can I ask your full name :) ?
You can. Though I am not going to tell you what my full name is. Though a nickname I often answer too is ‘Leah’.

The novel Fate by A C Heller can be bought at these sites:-

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ac_heller
Amazon buy link for Fate:
http://www.amazon.com/Fate-Sacrifice-ebook/dp/B00EEIFNXI/
Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/367017
Barnes and Noble:
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/fate-ac-heller/1117207992?ean=2940148766780
Kobo: http://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/ebook/fate-an-action-adventure-romance-novel

A C Heller, Thank You very much!

Author Interview with Abby L Vandiver

We bid a warm welcome to author Abby L Vandiver

In The Beginning by Abby L Vandiver author Author Abby Vandiver

Abby Vandiver – Interview with Grey Wolf

1. How long have you been writing?

Well, I’ve been obligated to write by way of my job for many years. As to fiction, I wrote my book, In the Beginning, in 1997, didn’t write anything after that and now have started writing the sequel, The Westbury End Book Club. So, it really isn’t very long at all. Hope that doesn’t show in my book!

2. What is the earliest work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

In the Beginning. Wrote in 1997, but not published until 2013.

3. Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?

I read a lot when I was pre-teen and early teen age years, but I graduated from high school when I was sixteen and once in college stopped reading for pleasure at all. So, honestly I don’t have anyone that inspires my writing. The only author’s name I can remember from way back then is Beverly Cleary and I don’t even remember what she wrote!

4. Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

Maybe not so much inspired by them as by their history. It always makes for an interesting story when you learn about the reason a structure was erected and what happened during that time.

5. Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

I don’t suppose I was surprised by it. You have to realize before you set out that someone is not going to like your work. I was surprised how people took it out of context and thought there was some hidden agenda to my work. But, I also think that negative comments may point out things you may not otherwise have noticed about your work and makes you improve and become a better writer.

6. Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?

Honestly, I don’t have any heroes. I have always done the best I can to help others and really believe, and expect, that others to do the same. I think that we have that obligation to do as best we can.

7. If you could go back in time to learn the truth about one historical mystery or disputed event what would it be?

This is actually a very good question because my book is about ancient mysteries and what really happened. And, of course, I’ve revealed the answers to these mysteries in my book. So, some things can be answered just by reading it! But seriously, I would love to see how ancient structures were really built, things like the statues on Easter Island, the Pyramids or who carved the lines and animals in the Nazca Plains.

Author Website
www.abbylvandiver.com

Amazon US
http://www.amazon.com/In-the-Beginning-ebook/dp/B00DPOF6IE/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=8-3&qid=1382015952

Amazon UK

http://www.amazon.co.uk/In-Beginning-Abby-L-Vandiver-ebook/dp/B00DPOF6IE/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1382016059&sr=1-1&keywords=in+the+beginning+abby+vandiver

Smashwords

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/329208

Barnes and Noble

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/in-the-beginning-abby-vandiver/1116810835?ean=2940148695028

Goodreads

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18144641-in-the-beginning

Twitter
@AbbyVandiver

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/#!/authorabbyl.vandiver

Amazon Author Page

http://www.amazon.com/Abby-L-Vandiver/e/B00DQBGFMW/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

Abby Vandiver, Thank You very much!

Author Interview with Chantal Bellehumeur

We bid a warm welcome to Chantal Bellehumeur

 author Chantal Bellehumeur author

I always loved to write but never thought about publishing anything until a friend of mine told me I should. Before that, I was more interested in acting. I performed in a couple of amateur stage shows and joined a Youth run Theatre Company. I was also an extra in a few commercials, TV shows and movies.
My love for acting soon got replaced with the love for my son. I made him my number one priority. I found it easier to write on my spare time than to work around other people’s schedules to act. I found that I had to use some of my acting training to write since I had to put myself in the shoes of the characters I created.

I write a bit of everything; Horror is more ME, but I wrote a series of soap operas/romance books for female readers as well as a fantasy book for my pre-teen son. I have been receiving a lot of positive feedback and am hoping that others will help me pass the word along about my books, even if I simply write as a hobby.

I started writing short stories for The Suburban’s Online Magazine.
While I continue to come up with stories, I encourage my son to so some writing of his own since he is full of good ideas and has a big imagination. He reminds me of myself as a child.
I am a single mom and feel very lucky to have my son in my life.

Chantal Bellehumeur – Interview with Grey Wolf

1. How long have you been writing?

Technically, ever since I learned how. I loved inventing stories before I went to school so I would dictate my stories to my mom; at least that is what she told me. In school, I wrote a lot of little stories and loved making little books by stapling pieces of papers together. As I grew older, I wrote longer stories and attempted several times to write novels for fun but gave up on them because I did not have the time to work on them. I never really thought about publishing anything until a friend of mine told me I should. This was after writing “Veronica’s Soap Opera Life” in 2009.

2. What is the earliest work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

My fictional diary “Veronica’s Soap Opera Life”. I have since then written two more books in the series. I also included the main character of this series in a series of short stories I wrote for an online magazine. The main characters of each series meet and become friends.

3. Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?

No author inspired my writing, but I did enjoy reading Stephen King and watching horror movies as a teen.

4. Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?

I try not to get influenced by other author’s work. I will post a review to show my appreciation though.

5. Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

Yes. My travels have inspired many of my stories. I keep a travel journal and a scrapbook of pictures.

6. Which was the first book you published and why?

My fictional diary “Veronica’s Soap Opera Life.” Before writing the draft for this book, I had never finished a novel; only short stories. I told somebody and she me asked why I didn’t publish it so I asked myself the same question. I figured it would not hurt to try. I never thought I would be writing so much afterwards. Now the ideas won’t stop!!! Lol I give myself time to do this hobby now.

7. Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

Not really. You can’t please everyone.
Some people did not like the fact that I purposely left spelling mistakes in my Veronica series while others loved the idea that I made the diaries look real.
Some people thought “Just.Another.Common.Killer” was too disturbing, but I didn’t get bad reviews for it.
Not everyone liked the family oriented short stories I wrote for The Suburban Online Magazine, but those who did enjoy them praised them and said that I was a really good writer so… Whenever I get a bad comment I tell myself that The Suburban, who has NEVER published a short story during their 50 years of existence until I came along, would not be publishing my stories if they were bad. Not everyone will like them, but I write for those who do. Some people can’t wait for the next story to come out and it motivates me to continue writing.

8. Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?

Who’s left? Lol Do my GI’s count? I was diagnosed with Colitis four years ago and it’s been really tough at times but I have great doctors who have helped me over the years. The people at the CCFC (Colitis and Chron’s Foundation of Canada) were great too. The expensive medication I am now taking is 100% covered so in a way my insurance company and other government programme that pay for it are my heroes as well.
F.Y.I, I wrote an article on my illness, which was published in March 29 2013 city and West Island editions of The Suburban newspaper. If you are curious to read it, you can go to the archived paper at the following link: http://edition.pagesuite-professional.co.uk//launch.aspx?eid=c11b5a25-eaf7-4f61-b955-fcd225eb252d&pnum=21
(Note that the article starts on page 21 and continues on page 32)

9. If you could go back in time to learn the truth about one historical mystery or disputed event what would it be?

Right now I would have to say go back to Whitechapel before the 1900’s to find out who Jack the Ripper was and how many victims he really had. It would be interesting to see if my fictional horror book “Just.Another.Common.Killer” has any truth to it; I mean, aside from the facts I found while doing research. It might inspire me to write the REAL story about Jack the Ripper and put the poor souls he murdered to rest.

For more information about and writing, visit website and Author Pages:-

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Chantal-Bellehumeur-public-author-page/347446362035640
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4538804.Chantal_Bellehumeur
http://www.authorgraph.com/authors/c_bellehumeur
Chantal Bellehumeur’s Amazon Author Central profile

Chantal Bellehumeur, Thank You very much!

Ten Naval Battles

My Naval Alternate History (#2) book ‘Ten Naval Battles’ is available free on Smashwords for a limited period of 5 days using the following voucher code.

JG65H

Go to
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/367645

Purchase it, and in the purchase dialogue enter the above code and it will remove 100% of the price, thus making it free.

Offer expires November 20th. Only available to readers of my blog.

Author Interview with Kristina Blasen

We bid a warm welcome to Kristina Blasen author of: ‘Sambala The Mighty And Mimba The Wanderer’, ‘Grey Weir’, ‘Tales of The Wyrd’, and ‘The Adventures of Sample Girl’.

Kristina Blasen author Tales of the Wyrd by Kristina Blasen

Kristina Blasen is a dabbler. She writes a dab of this and a bit of that. Her short story collection, Tales of the Wyrd explores dark fantasy, paranormal themes and alternative timelines. If you see 11:11, you need to read this collection! She also enjoys writing children’s fantasy and has two children’s books, Orion and the Land of the Tomatoes and Sambala the Mighty and Mimba the Wanderer. As a poet, she offers three poetry chapbooks: The Wildwood Guardian, Grey Weir and Slipshod Mornings & Meandering Midnights. Kristina is currently finishing her first full length novel, a science fiction fantasy called Gateways through the Penumbra which will be released in 2014. Kristina currently lives in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Amazon profile:
http://www.amazon.com/Kristina-Blasen/e/B00979M7YW

Facebook profile:
http://www.facebook.com/KristinaBlasenbooks

Smashreads:
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/63861

Kristina Blasen – Interview with Grey Wolf

1. How long have you been writing?

I have been thinking about writing and being a writer since I was a kid! In college I took creative writing courses and poetry classes and I’ve spent years working as a newspaper reporter, but I didn’t really start putting together my writing as books until 2009.

2. What is the earliest work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

My earliest published work was written in 1999 in a children’s writing class at Eckerd College. It’s my children’s book Sambala the Mighty and Mimba the Wanderer. I can still see those characters having fun and dancing around in my head to this day.

3. Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?

L.M. Montgomery was a huge writing inspiration for me as a young girl. I fell in love with her lesser known Emily of New Moon series while everyone else was reading Anne of Green Gables. Her description and ability to create the scene in minute detail endlessly fascinated me, and it helped that it is a series of books following the life of a young girl who wants to be a writer! Reading truly is the best way to learn to write. I also fed my imagination when I was younger with books by Madeleine L’Engle and William Sleator.

4. Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?

Anne Bishop is one of my favorite authors. She writes dark fantasy. I found her accidentally one day in a book of short stories and had to go back and find all of the different books she has written after that! I think what I admire most is how she can make her characters feel real with all of the good and bad traits they have and how she can write strong characters, both male and female, who still have struggles and foibles. I learned a lot about world building and character creating from reading her books and can only aspire to create a place so vividly in my own first novel, Gateways Through the Penumbra.

5. Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

I’m inspired by my dreams and they feed many of the visions of different fantasy landscapes that feature in my novel. For poetry, I am often inspired by the beauty of the real world around me to write. I lived near Minneapolis for many years and the graffiti in the city, the lights in the fog and the architecture of the buildings often inspired my poetry and song writing.

6. Which was the first book you published and why?

The first book I published was my poetry chapbook, Gray Weir. I started out writing as a hobby using a website called Allpoetry and found out that people really enjoyed my poetry and my stories which eventually gave me the confidence I needed to publish a collection of my poems and to perform those poems at a poetry reading.

7. Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

I write across many different topics and in different styles. When I know someone who expresses an interest in my work personally I can usually guide them to which of my books they will enjoy and which they won’t. Some of my books touch on paranormal themes, reincarnation, the 11:11 phenomena and others are non-fiction or autobiographical so I can usually find at least one book they will enjoy.

8. Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?

I admire self-made women in many fields. I’d admire not just their success, but their confidence, talent and tenacity to create the life they envision for themselves and to better the world, even as they often balance other responsibilities with their family or children.

9. If you could go back in time to learn the truth about one historical mystery or disputed event what would it be?

I’d like to know the truth about so many things! I’d like to know more about the Anasazi Indians and their cliff-dwelling lifestyle. I’ve visited the cliffs and the ruins in Mesa Verde (which is in Colorado in the US) and the year I went there had been a brush fire that had cleared the land at the top of the cliff and biologists found that suddenly there was ancient corn growing there that had lain dormant since the time of the Anasazi. I’m intrigued by things like that from the past all the time.

Kristina Blasen, Thank You very much!

Never The Dawn

 author

In an alternate timeline, the Emperor of Albion is one of the most powerful on Earth, stretching across North America, Great Britain, Iberia and North-West Africa. Its armies are famed for winning, and its vice-royalties govern securely. The twelve chivalrous Grand Orders have long since turned into entities more akin to mafia and corporations, but they get along, apart from that of the Serpent which has gone off on a darkened path of its own. Cyclops, the giant computer network takes information and gives answers, manned by masters and acolytes of its own. Giant airships tie the provinces together and in Albion City, the Emperor and his court hold sway.

But now mysterious globes of light are coming out of the jungle, supporting the Fulani rebels and attacking Albion’s outposts throughout West Africa. Worse, there seem to be lights in other locations within the empire. And now the Grand Order of the Serpent rears its head.

Never The Dawn is now available as a paperback from Amazon, for kindle through KDP Amazon and all other ebook formats from Smashwords.

Kindle on Amazon UK
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Never-The-Dawn-ebook/dp/B00FK5A4NS/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1381423999&sr=1-1&keywords=never+the+dawn

Kindle on Amazon.com
http://www.amazon.com/Never-The-Dawn-ebook/dp/B00FK5A4NS/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1381423999&sr=1-1&keywords=never+the+dawn

Smashwords
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/363516

Paperback at Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/Never-Dawn-Grey-Wolf/dp/1491040831/ref=sr_1_1_title_0_main?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1381424864&sr=1-1&keywords=never+the+dawn

Never The Dawn features an original artwork by London-based artist Derek Roberts

Inferno

In the lead-up to Doctor Who’s Fiftieth Anniversary, Grey Wolf’s Blog will be hosting the event “Monday Favourite Dr Who Story“ (except last week when the Royal Mail kidnapped my DVD and I couldn’t watch it in time!)

Inferno is a seven episode story from 1970, starring Jon Pertwee as the Doctor and Caroline John as Liz Shaw, as well as Nicholas Courtney as Lethbridge-Stewart.

Although it lasts for over two and a half hours, it is a fast-paced and exciting adventure, with Pertwee at his masterful best. In essence the story is of a scheme to drill below the world’s crust to discover infinite energy, but a scheme that runs into a primeval evil, so to speak.

The characters at the drill head play an excellent dual role, as the Doctor accidentally travels to a parallel world, where a fascist Britain has similar characters in authoritarian positions. It is fantastic fun to see Courtney play a Brigade Leader whose simplistic militarism is forced into a sensible realism by the disaster inflicted upon his world.

It might in many ways be Caroline John’s best performance as Liz Shaw, a scientist in the real world, and a security leader in the fascist parallel one. The supporting cast, as Benton, Sutton, Petra and Stahlman also play an excellent dual role, and though some of the basic underlying science with regard to the primeval creatures is suspect, and the make-up and so on a bit suspect, it in no way detracts from the story.

The alternate reality has gone further and worse than the real world, but in it we see real heroism, sometimes against the nature of the character who is forced into compliance, and in many cases sees the true essence of the characters shine through when heroism despite despair is the natural reaction.

In every way this story is done as best as one could expect for 1970. It is far better than many shows contemporary to that time. The action is dramatic, the dialogue good, and the split between the two realities is portrayed in an excellent fashion.

Courtney’s alternate Brigade Leader’s breakdown is done really well, in the face of adversity and disaster he loses all control when up to then he has been holding it together just barely.

I always wonder why people in extremis never take their ties off, just loosen them dramatically and this story offers no answer. Sutton would be better off without the ridiculous appendage around his neck, but he never removes it.

For a seven-part story, Inferno really captures the imagination and you care about what happens. In the time that it was made, I don’t think it could have been done any better.