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Interview with Spanish Spy

I’m from the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, and I go by the name SpanishSpy on AlternateHistory.com (I can’t say I’m too comfortable giving out information on the Internet). A list of my works on that site can be found here:- http://wiki.alternatehistory.com/doku.php/offtopic/spanishspy

How long have you been writing?

I first creatively wrote in 4th and 5th grade by writing script-like “comics” to friends of mine via email. I wrote my first AH in 6th grade (I was 11 or 12) with the PoD being if John Cabot’s expedition became violent with Native Americans. This butterflied into a war between England, France, and Spain.

What is the first work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

I’m no published author, so I can’t say anything on this. The closest thing I can get to is my first work of AH that I put on the internet, which was originally a project I did for my 8th grade geography class. It was called The Hammer, the Sickle, the Earth, and was a blatant Sovietwank, with a balkanized America, a USSR that went as far west as Germany and as far south as Vietnam, as well as directly annexing western Canada after its PoD, where the Soviet Union intervenes in the Korean War on the behalf of the Chinese. Things get horrendously implausible from there, but I had a hell of a lot of fun writing it.

Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?
When I was in Middle School, my father let me read several books in his collection of science fiction novels; one of my favorites was Childhood’s End by Arthur C. Clarke. Coincidentally, a friend of mine got me a collection of his stories, and I later read the Space Odyssey novels in addition to several others by him, and then onto Asimov, Niven, Heinlein, Bear, and others. This interest in science fiction led me one day to looking up more books on the internet, and I found out about Harry Turtledove’s WorldWar series. After gleefully reading all eight books, I read all eleven books of TL-191 in quick succession, and then The Guns of the South, The Man with an Iron Heart, and many others, and then other alternate history off of Amazon on my Kindle.

Also during Middle school I was exposed to the general “international politics” (for lack of a better term) interest that I had, which evolved after gushing over the lore of the Command and Conquer series of PC games. They took me to theoretical World War III scenarios on YouTube (which are in retrospect absolutely implausible), and then I found the videos of a user named alternatehistorypt, whose videos are not plausible either but served to eventually put me on the path of actual alternate history.

Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?

I’m a little odd in that I haven’t read much for a while, and yet I am an utter geek. A lot of my influences, therefore, have been from games on the PC. There’s a lot of Command and Conquer influences in my work, subtle they may be. My work, The Beacon of Halifax, has taken a good deal of inspiration from Bioshock: Infinite after being inspired in part by Command and Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars. Perhaps it is best I break down my influences by significant works:
Liberty and Death: a Timeline of an Otherworldly Revolution and Beyond: this was inspired by a ghost story I read in the books Weird Massachusetts by Jeff Belanger, and I subsequently blew it out of all rational proportions. One of the major characters in the timeline, Thompson Phillips, was an actual but obscure man, and the house owned by John Hancock in the timeline was really owned by him, but in OTL never used by him.
The Beacon of Halifax: as I said before, it was inspired by Command and Conquer 3, in addition to a trip I took to Halifax, Nova Scotia between 8th grade and my freshman year of high school. In the PC game, a major plot point is an earthly explosion beginning an alien invasion. In my work, the 1917 Halifax Explosion is the catalyst to a similar invasion. Additionally, some ideas have been inspired by Bioshock: Infinite. On the topic of books, Harry Turtledove’s WorldWar has been a source of inspiration.
Emancipation and Exodus: This was inspired more by the general sociopolitical zeitgeist of the 2010s, especially by the controversy from the Snowden leaks and the growth of the security/bureaucratic state; I think that if a literary critic or an anthropologist reads it after a few decades, they would be able to say it is a product of these times. In the updates I’ve written, at least (my coauthor, Blackjack555, may be thinking something different), there are themes of government corruption, disillusionment with public figures and institutions, corruption of noble ideals, the growth of government bureaucracy, and how a democracy could become tyranny gradually. Aesthetically, it takes a few pages from Ad Astra per Aspera, an amazing work on alternatehistory.com by the user Rvbomally (which partially inspired the idea of alternate history extended into the future; the core of it is based on an idea for a story my coauthor had). Thematically, it borrows some from Bioshock Infinite and a little from the CoDominium series by Jerry Pournelle.
Scorpions in a Bottle: I wanted to do what David Bar Elias did to TL-191 to For Want of a Nail. This timeline is a result.

Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

On occasion, I try to describe a city, for example, based on what the suburbs of Washington look like, as well as the countryside of north-central Virginia (where my family goes on day trips to). Other inspirations have included southwestern Texas and Washington proper, as well as bits of London and rural Lincolnshire.

Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

I did something stupid while writing The Beacon of Halifax and got chewed out for it. It was surprising, but I understood the rationale for it. However, I feel I’ve turned that poor decision into a very interesting plot point, so I feel it’s become a net positive. It’s even influenced, for the better, my conception of the timeline’s future twenty years or so after the current point.

Are there any themes driving your writing?

I have always found the approach of taking a theme and then writing about it as producing preachy, heavy handed works that are often dull; only a few works in my experience, like Orwell’s 1984, do it well. Rather, I start with a setting, and the themes grow out of them. For example, The Beacon of Halifax lets me explore the concept of what TvTropes calls “Evil vs. Oblivion,” the question of to what extent is it morally sound to support an evil individual or regime to fight an even greater evil? This is the focus of the recent arc focusing on Grayson Chester’s liberation of Memphis.
Despite my dislike for that method, I am guilty of writing with a theme in mind (but it did not arise until well into planning it), in Emancipation and Exodus. I find the notion that, in the future, humanity will somehow become better morally and ethically to be naïve and, frankly, childish. Star Trek, for example, uses this idea, and I vehemently disagree with it. People are, by their nature (in my opinion), shortsighted, vindictive, vengeful, brutal, and murderous, and no amount of charity or goodwill is able to fully overcome that. The future (of an alternate history with a 21st century PoD, so many things are still recognizable to us) of Emancipation and Exodus is a brutal one, where a hyperpower exploits human space at its leisure while being impeded by an overwhelming bureaucracy and politicization of most issues. The history of this universe is a bleak one, with multiple wars with liberal nuclear and chemical weapons usage (a favorite tactic of this hyperpower is the issuing of vaccines to citizens who swear allegiance to it on a newly conquered or rebellious world, while an artificial plague runs rampant on those that did not – credit to my coauthor, Blackjack555, for this idea).

What makes this so compelling to me is that, even in space, people are still people (I see this phrase as a sort of thematic statement of that work). I feel that, given the power to do so, people would do all the things in this timeline in real life. I find it interesting to subvert common science fiction tropes with a barbarous twist; rather being some uplifting, species unifying occurrence, the discovery of Faster-than-Light travel is during a major war and is subsequently used to kill thousands of innocents to prove a political point.
And yet, this theme of the inherent humanity of people is not necessarily pessimistic all of the time in that work; there are other touches in the story that are kinder and more mundane. People sell tacky gifts at spaceports and sing angry songs at rivals in love, and gush over the taste of a good hamburger (from Earth, even). One of my favorite examples is the name of a planet: Dote di Vittoria, or ‘Victoria’s Dowry’ in English. The backstory behind this is, when the system was surveyed, a young surveyor smitten with the daughter of a mining magnate, claims the mineral-rich world in his name and gives to his family in exchange for permission to marry his daughter. It’s romantic, perhaps melodramatic, but people are just that way.

Are there any genres, whether thematic or stylistic, that you enjoy writing?

In terms of subject, I usually write Alien Space Bats works mainly because those are most of my ideas and because I am afraid any non-ASB idea would be poorly executed (I have one such idea with a point of divergence in the Mexican Revolution that I am terrified of writing because of fear that it would be implausible). ASB lets me take the real and disrupt it with the absurd or impossible, and see the realistic (to a given degree) response of the actual world in question, a confluence of the real and unreal that I find quite fun to write.
In terms of style, I like writing in a textbook style moreso than a novelistic style, as it allows me to cover more history while not restricting myself to certain perspectives (although the latter approach certainly has its advantages, and I enjoy writing my timelines in that style). I once talked to someone of whom I had made an acquaintance about Emancipation and Exodus, and he insisted that I needed a central character to explore the universe. Had this conversation occurred over the internet rather than in person, I would have sent him that image macro that says “that’s not how this works. That’s not how any of this works.” I find the ‘macro’ of history far more interesting than the ‘micro’ of history, so to speak, and Emancipation and Exodus is written from the ‘macro’ perspective, giving multiple points of view from different time periods, expounding on the theme of the corruption and decay of a noble ideal. EaE is not a drama of a few people; it’s the tragedy of a species.

Which was the first writing of yours that you are proud enough to say “I did this” about?

The Rise of the Tri-State World Order: A Timeline of Orwell’s 1984 was my first work that was critically praised, and reflected a massive effort on my part, writing four to five pages a day, plus research, for about three weeks, with the resultant product being fifty-five pages long. It was originally a project for an English class, and I got the highest grade possible, so that’s a plus. Getting the 2014 Turtledove for Best New Speculative certainly helps as well (my highest thanks to those who voted for it).
The other work that I am quite proud of is my Christmas special for the year of 2013, So Be Good for Goodness’ Sake: A Holiday Timeline. It’s a parody of the general feeling of government paranoia and public distrust of government in the 2010s, especially in the wake of the Snowden leaks, while framed in the context of a government pursuit of Santa Claus; in a phrase, it’s ‘Santa Claus vs. the NSA.’ There are some scenes where the tragedy of the story is balanced by the inherent absurdity that having Santa Claus as a character entails, and I think personally I used that juxtaposition effectively.

Do you find Alternate History a genre that is more difficult to write in than others, perhaps due to the focus on plausibility?

Yes. I spend a lot of time fact-checking, even down to slang and tidbits of everyday life, to ensure a feeling of authenticity. Most of my work is ASB (if not all of it), but I want to make sure it’s an accurate world that I am messing around with. It’s just so much more fun seeing a historically accurate world interrupted by something bizarre and impossible, rather than a half-baked, poorly researched one, which just becomes something focused on the bizarreness of the whole thing, lacking the characteristic of disrupted realism that good alternate history has.
Additionally, Emancipation and Exodus is not written in chronological order like my other works; the timeline jumps around century to century. Keeping continuity is hard, and I often have a second tab with the timeline open while writing to keep my writing consistent with established canon. For my older works, such as Liberty and Death, The Beacon of Halifax, and Scorpions in a Bottle also require such constant continuity-checking.

Do you write much non-narrative fiction, e.g. in the pseudo-historical fashion of articles and features from another world?

Yes; in some ways I find it more interesting than a narrative format, detailed above in my discussion of the structure of Emancipation and Exodus. Both Scorpions in a Bottle and Emancipation and Exodus are in a variety of nonfiction formats, while Tim Kane Lives is exclusively written as a series of news articles; it is intended, to a degree, to be a parody of the 2016 US Presidential Elections we see quite frequently on AH.com’s future history forum. Additionally, many of my oneshots are in the format of a history text; Wheels of the Patriots is in the format of an encyclopedia entry. As stated previously, I enjoy this format as it allows for a more full understanding of the world and the issues at hand; it feels more real, more understandable, and more complete.
Perhaps most interesting in terms of format is my work The Creators of This Hell: an Alternate 1940s, which I wrote as a background guide for a Model United Nations conference that I was chairing for middle school students. They were supposed to assume the roles of countries in this universe and debate two topics (which are given special treatment in the work) of concern in a mock League of Nations session; the work itself is in the format of a LoN dossier.

Do you find that much of your writing turns out to be Science Fiction, whether or not it was intended to?

If it is extended into the future, it naturally becomes Science Fiction due to the necessity of extrapolating changes in technology; certainly even when it is not science fiction, there is some of that. Some of my work shows some science-fiction-like elements; Liberty and Death required some creative thinking in regards to technology merging the designs of Da Vinci with technology of the 1700s; we have Congreve Rocket-powered airships launched from France invading Britain, and fighters in the sky intercepting enemy aircraft, as well as Da Vinci style circle tanks armed with Congreve Rocket batteries and cannons, and on one occasion Greek Fire. Liberty and Death generally verges on a form of clockpunk for the Catholic Church and associated nations and Magitek for the United States of Fredonia, as I call it; the latter uses magic-powered aircraft that act essentially like fighter planes and cargo variants of these are gradually phasing out naval ships.

Author Interview with Roisterer

I’m an old git by most standards. I was born and raised in the UK, but I’ve lived in the USA since 2001, and became a US citizen in 2013. I’m a Kentish man by birth.
I design silicon chips for a living, and have to remember that not everybody likes the technical stuff as much as I do.
I’m unpublished. All of my works are on AlternateHistory.com (AH) or Counter-Factual.net (CF). I have three novels completed, and a fourth starting, plus several short stories. I’m very much an amateur, and I hold down a full time job, so I never get as much time for writing as I would like.

Question 1
How long have you been writing?

I’ve been writing since 2011. I honestly would never have thought about putting characters to screen – the modern version of pen to paper – until I had read other people doing the same thing.

Question 2
What is the first work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

I’m not sure that I have anything good enough to publish. I might hawk The Arrangement or Bus Trip to some short story anthologies.

Question 3
Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?

I read a lot of science fiction as a teenager. My favourites at the time were Asimov, Clarke, Bester, Knight, McCaffrey. Laumer and Niven.

Question 4
Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?

There have been a few stand out moments. In an otherwise undistinguished anthology I read in the 80s there was a story that felt completely unlike anything I’d read before. It was called Burning Chrome, by William Gibson. It’s been said that the most effective stories don’t tell you how the future will be, but what it will feel like.
I also like Brian Aldiss’s Billion Year Spree, which is a kind of primer on other books. I doubt I would have read any Lovecraft without having read that first.

On AH I’d name Doctor What (Bruno Lombardi) Chris Nuttall, Thande and the late Robert Parker, all of whom posted things on line. They all have very different voices, and convinced me that if they could do it, I could do it too.
Oh, and Grey Wolf is always worth reading, There is a sense of immediacy in his work that is lacking in a lot of others, plus the stories seem to lead in unexpected directions. A kind of Van Vogt for alternate history.

Question 5
Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

In its broader sense, location and milieu are very important. Would Phillip Marlowe be the same if he came from a different city? In my longer fiction, I’ve tried to give an idea of place. Some of these are SF settings, so I try to put in something about what life is like there. As for buildings, not so much. My late father wouldn’t be happy, as he was an architect.

Question 6
Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

I don’t think that I’ve had enough reviews. People mostly don’t read it. Perhaps if I submit some work and get a lot of rejections, I’ll change my tune.

Question 7
Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?

Norman Borlaug and Jonas Salk. The two people who aren’t so well known, but between them probably saved more lives than any politician who has ever lived. Perhaps also Johannes Kepler, a man who threw away decades of work when it didn’t fit the observations. I wonder who would have the strength of character to do that nowadays?

Question 8
Which was the first writing of yours that you are proud enough to say “I did this” about?

Gravity Well, definitely. Firstly, it’s a detective novel, and these are tough to do, as you have to have a well thought out plot. Secondly, I was posting it a chapter at a time, which is especially challenging as you can’t retcon anything if you get any clues wrong. I also came up with a heck of a twist.

Question 9
Do you find Alternate History a genre that is more difficult to write in than others, perhaps due to the focus on plausibility?

If you start a story about a popular AH meme, then there’s going to be a lot of discussion about this. I don’t just mean the obvious ones, like the Nazis winning WWII. You have to remember that there’s always somebody out there who knows more about the subject than you do. So if you write of X becoming a tyrant, or doing something out of character, expect some blowback.
Having said that, like SF, it can hold up a useful mirror.

Question 10
Do you write much non-narrative fiction, e.g. in the pseudo-historical fashion of articles and features from another world?

Not so much, although sometimes I try to take a sideswipe at some modern attitudes.

Question 11
Do you find that much of your writing turns out to be Science Fiction, whether or not it was intended to?

Well, I pretty much intended for everything to be SF.There are a few of my stories that blend into horror, but there is some overlap there.

Question 12
If you could go back in time to learn the truth about one historical mystery or disputed event what would it be?

I’d like to know what happened to Anne Bonny, one of the female pirates in the early eighteenth century. Mostly I’d like to go back and tell certain people at certain times, “how could you be so stupid?”

Interview with K J Smith

I was born in Cambridge and still live there. My working life has be, mostly, in tech and lab work. I no longer work as I am disabled, but still play music as much a possible. Anything I do at www.alternatehistory.com, which is the only site of this kind I go on like this, my user name is tallthinkev. When I do publish it will be under my real name of K J Smith or John Strand, an old family name.

Question 1
How long have you been writing?

Just a couple of years and only when I first came across this site. This has been the first time I have ever written, and I use that term very lightly, any fiction. About 15 years ago I did have to write a tech manual, for the job I was then doing. It was by far the longest thing I had ever done up to that point.

Question 2
What is the first work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

I have helped out quite a bit the Hairogs story WWIII May ’46. As for my own ‘work’ I am now editing the first part of my story which is called, at the moment, Dark Antiquity. An ISOT where Britain is transported back from 1066 to 43AD. This I hope to publish when I am happy with it, maybe in a few months. That I hope to publish on Amazon.

Question 3
Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?

When I went to school there was no such thing as dyslexia, therefore I was a bit ‘thick’ and had to do double English with one to one reading lessons. I was 13/14 when I read my first books which were the, The Chronicles of Narnia. Weather this had any effect on any writing I have done I don’t know, it was sometime ago now.

Question 4
Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?

I think you have inspiration from everything you read, even if it’s going to be ‘I am not going to write like that.’ The ones I do like are those who have written for the Doctor Who range from Virgin and the BBC, before Nu-Who. People like Chris Boucher, Paul Leonard and Paul Cornell. Weather it is because I like the subject of the actual authors I’m not sure. I hope never to write in the style or subject matter of someone like Harry Harrison or Robert Conroy, at least I try to write about some thing I do know a little about, or do look something up I’m not sure about. They don’t!

Question 5
Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

Very much so. With the WWIII story I have used a lot of Cambridge and parts not too far away. Also my family is in it as well as those from history. However I have written about them in a real way. I have used them in a way that they could have really done in the situation.

Question 6
Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

I don’t think I have had anything really bad said about what I have done. If have done anything that someone has not agreed with, there have always done it in a nice way. As in pointing things out more than pointing fingers.

Question 7
Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?

Hero’s? None really. I can say this person is good, or has done very well.

Question 8
Which was the first writing of yours that you are proud enough to say “I did this” about?

Maybe it could be the one I’m writing now, however it is not finished yet. Saying that I have done over 20,000 word which is something I never thought I would ever do.

Question 9
Do you find Alternate History a genre that is more difficult to write in than others, perhaps due to the focus on plausibility?

It the only thing I’ve written, apart from songs. Songs can come very easy to me sometimes.

Kevin, Thank You very much!

Interview with Fenwick

Writer Interview with Fenwick

Fenwick, who is not giving his name or image as he holds a general fear of something he calls The Machine, is a practicing Public Defender in California. He lives in the 8th most conservative city in the United States, which makes being a regular Democratic party volunteer a tad akward. After graduating with a BA in history he promptly went to Law School where he graduated magna cum laude. Currently he is seeking out his International Common Law Certificate in hopes of working for the US diplomatic corps.

He is not a published author, but has made numerous attempts at it. Most of his work is found on AH.com.

Question 1
How long have you been writing?

Since I was about thirteen.

Question 2
What is the earliest work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

I had art friends who really had this drive to make comics. This was in that odd point when we had the internet but no one used the internet. Meaning this was all by hand. So you had 13 year old boys drawing impossibly, Rob Liefeld inspired narrow waisted big breasted women, and overly muscular men. Then you had me writing the story cause “Fen cannot draw for shit, yo.” And, yes he really did say “yo.” Mind you I was on the “project” for all of three weeks before they kicked me off. They wanted violent, super powerful, murdering space gods. I wanted this:

Only picture I drew for them. Simply 13 year olds get powers, and to me they had no skills at all. So it was buying Lucha Libre masks, and just whatever was at the thrift shop. I kept writing what I felt was realism and no one wanted that so away I went. They published something, but it was on the school printer for like one issue.

Question 3
Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?

I really liked Tom Wolf. First book I got into, like could not stop reading was “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test.” It was his personal account of traveling the world with Ken Keesy (One flew over the cuckoos nest) and it was about drugs, but not really. Just these really honest conversations and events.

Question 4
Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?

Terry Pratchett for his sense of humor, and also taking clearly impossible events but setting them in what can only be real life. A cop in a world with dwarves, elves, and trolls. Or a “hero” who is a honest coward.

Harry Turtledove for giving me scifi trash novels. Not as in bad but as in plentiful, cheap, and giving me what I want. My that sounds really bad out loudE

Warren Ellis. Comic book author but I view comics as any other medium. Yet when he writes about things that are not superheroes he is amazing. Ministry of Space is one to pick up, it is the British Empire conquering the stars thanks to a certain WWII black budget. Transmetropolitan an amazing technological society which has just as much crime, disease, poverty, and everything. Lastly is Planetary, which while having superheroes is really this amazing attempt to make all literature, cinema, and any idea of heroes and villains live in a unified world.

Question 5
Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

Kansas City is one. I have been to China, Europe, and South America but as an America I say Kansas City Missouri. It is that awful mix of urban blight, urban sprawl, urban renewal, and urban decay in one central location. You can see these amazing Art Deco buildings right next to rusting out pre-WWI factories, and at the same time what looks like someone nailed 2014 technology to the side of the buildings. It is a really nice city mind you, but it is the ability to go from a wooden shack and fifteen minutes later be in the most ornate of buildings. Really it is how I like to view things in the world, a big huge mess of things somehow working out.

Another is Los Angeles. I live here, and I get to enjoy not the freeway and chain restaurants but the side streets and very clearly defined neighborhoods. It is kind of cool to walk down a street and suddenly everything is in Spanish, and then turn the corner and you are in Little Tokyo. Plus ever since the smog was cut down it is just bright and blue sky.

Question 6
Which was the first writing of yours that you are proud enough to say “I did this about?

For me it was this story in which it is the 1920s. An art critic and his boyfriend are at a party to see this new painter. These guys have to be in this room of communists, and booze hounds flaunting prohibition but have to hide being gay. Yet all of this is so they can see the amazing abstract artworks of Adolf Hitler. I really liked that story. Wrote it in like two hours.

Question 7
Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

In college I wrote this story for the campus literary magazine. It was a really simple story about a guy in a train station avoiding the police. The guy had a bomb, and it was the liberation front or something. Of course everywhere was swastika flags and such so obviously the guy was the hero. I got my little certificate, and my $20 but it was in the “filler pile.” So it was never needed. While that bummed me out, on my submission draft was this single message at the end which was like, “This was rather insulting.” To this day I have no idea what that meant. Was it the terrorism? Was the reader a Nazi? What? Tell me Mrs. T what was it?!

Question 8
Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?

I like, I guess you would call them crafty people? Thurgood Marshall, SCOTUS justice, ACLU lawyer, went to the Southern US in the 1950s to defend black men accused of rape or murder. He was a really smart guy, and surprisingly brave, but it was that “I trust the law” kind of bravely. I know in about twenty minutes I will be in my car and go “oh should have him!” But really the British Naval Intelligence of WWII, or the CIA, even some of the lesser known NATO intelligence operations in which a handful of guys clearly diverted thousands if not millions of men on some harebrained scheme.

Question 9
Do you find Alternate History a genre that is more difficult to write in than others, perhaps due to the focus on plausibility?

Not at all. What is plausible? I mean WWI was because a single guy died in his car which took a wrong turn after trying to visit people injured from an assassination attempt earlier that day? Go to a civil war museum sometimes, and you will see two bullets fused together titled, “US-Confederate musket balls.” In any film that is when the audience rolls their eyes and leaves. However it happened all the time. So when someone says it is not plausible something occurred all that means is that the half-baked reason why something occurs needs a few more minutes in the old mental oven.

Question 10
Do you write much non-narrative fiction, e.g. in the pseudo-historical fashion of articles and features from another world?

I play a game called Shared Worlds. The entire idea is to take a nation and write its history from a factual stand point. Some write stories, myself included, but mostly it is writing detailed events.

Question 11
Your ‘Fenwick Writing Challenges” inspired 2 of my short stories that I later turned into novellas. Do you know how inspirational you were? Do you know if any other works resulting from those were published?

In some ways yes, but it always surprises me how many have gone “hey Fenwick great idea there.” Really I get these ideas and I know I cannot write them how they are in my head, so I send them off to others. To my knowledge no one else really used my writing challenges and got them published. I know I have gotten nice rejection letters from all the stories I wrote for them.

Question 12
If you could go back in time to learn the truth about one historical mystery or disputed event what would it be?

I want to know who Jack the Ripper is. I cannot explain why that event is so interesting to me. I think it is the setting. All those smoke filled, foggy hazed nights and some fellow in a top hat arrives luring his victims away. It is like the perfect horror story for Victorian London, and yet the fact it really happened only to suddenly stop makes me really want to know who Jack was.

Interview with author Paul Leone

Grey Wolf’s Blog welcomes author Paul Leone for an Author Interview.

Paul Leone

Paul Leone grew up on a strange diet of Tolkien, Lewis, Lucas, Roddenberry, Stoker, monster movies and comic books. This genre passion has inexplicably fused with his entrance into the Catholic Church to give you the Vatican Vampire Hunters series. He currently resides in Western New York with a cat who is not at all interested in his overly large collection of bad movies.

Paul Leone is the author of the Vatican Vampire Hunters novels. His profile can be viewed: Paul Leone at Amazon; Vatican Vampire Hunters on Facebook; and Paul Leone at Goodreads. Purchase links for the books can be found at the end of the Interview.

Question 1 – How long have you been writing?

Professionally, for just a year or so, but I’ve been scribbling stories since I was in middle school. I think
the first one I ever wrote (or at least started) was a Quantum Leap fanfic.

Question 2 – What is the earliest work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

Mysterious Albion, the first book in the Vatican Vampire Hunters series.

Question 3 – Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?

Inspirations specific to my urban fantasy are the late John Steakley and Bram Stoker, and M.R. James for his ghost stories.

Question 4 – Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?

Without a doubt, J.R.R. Tolkien is at the top of the list. He practically invented the genre of high fantasy and found an inspiring way to infuse it with his religious beliefs. Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Arthur Machen, John Whitbourn – all excellent British authors in various genres, and Machen in particular (along with M.R. James) is helping me find the tone for my latest work, a novel about a Victorian occult detective.

Question 5 – Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

London and Rome, and my home in Western New York. London is far and away the greatest city in the world, in my mind, and it was a joy to use it as the setting for Mysterious Albion.

Question 6 – Which was the first writing of yours that you are proud enough to say “I did this” about?

I think some of the stories I wrote in college would qualify for that, although I also think I’ve improved – somewhat! – since then, too.

Question 7 – Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

No. The harshest review anybody’s posted so far (one for Mysterious Albion) was still fairly kind even as it pointed out some shortcomings in my writing style that I’ve tried to work on since then.

Question 8 – Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?

Tolkien, St. Augustine, WW2 veterans (and veterans in general), the man who invented pizza.

Question 9 – Do you find Alternate History a genre that is more difficult to write in than others, perhaps due to the focus on plausibility?

I haven’t done much writing in the way of AH itself, but I think it’s a fine line – you want to keep things plausible, but you also want to make it entertaining. My favorite AH novel, Fatherland, is built on a fairly weak “Nazis win WW2″ scenario, but it’s still a classic of the genre.

Question 10 – How much historical, or existing vampire and demon law did you bring into your stories, and how much did you make up for the Vatican Vampire Hunter series?

As far as vampires go, I stuck with the classic Hollywood/modern idea of vampire weaknesses – sunlight, fire, holy water/symbols, etc. I don’t *think* anybody has used my particular take on the origin and nature of vampires before (which probably means 10 writers I’ve never encountered did it years ago). Regarding demons, they’re treated in a fairly Catholic manner. Most of the demonic names come from medieval and post-medieval demonology in the real world.

Question 11 – Did you find that writing the Vatican Vampire Hunters incorporated any elements of alternate history writing?

No, at least not any more than nearly every work of fiction is technically alternate history.

Question 12 – If you could go back in time to learn the truth about one historical mystery or disputed event what would it be?

I can only pick one? That’s tough, that’s really tough. What really crashed in Roswell in 1947, I guess.

Buy Links for Vatican Vampire Hunters

Mysterious Albion (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/Mysterious-Vatican-Vampire-Hunters-ebook/dp/B00BRIENTS
Mysterious Albion (Amazon POD): http://www.amazon.com/Mysterious-Albion-Vatican-Vampire-Hunters/dp/1482739828
Mysterious Albion (Nook): http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/mysterious-albion-paul-leone/1115319453
The Book of Thoth (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/Book-Thoth-Vatican-Vampire-Hunters-ebook/dp/B00G725FVO/
The Book of Thoth (Amazon POD): http://www.amazon.com/dp/149272839X

Author Interview with Fiona Skye

We bid a warm welcome to Fiona Skye

Fiona Skye author Faerie Tales, book 1 of the Revelations Trilogy

Fiona Skye is an urban fantasy novelist currently living in the deserts of Southern Arizona. She shares a home with her husband, two kids, three cats, and a Border Collie.

Fiona’s passion for story telling began early in life. At age twelve, she wrote her first short story, which was based on a song by 1980s hair band. She has dedicated her life since then to writing, only to be occasionally distracted by her insatiable love of yarn and crochet, and the dogged pursuit of the perfect plate of cheese enchiladas.

She counts Diana Gabaldon and Jim Butcher as her favorite authors and biggest influences. Joining these two on the list of people she would wait in queue for a week to have a coffee with are Neil Peart, David Tennant, and Brandon Sanderson.

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/fionaskyewriter
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/fionaskyewriter
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/fiona_skye

Fiona Skye – Interview with Grey Wolf

Question 1
How long have you been writing?

I’ve been writing since I was twelve years old, when I wrote my very first short story. It was based on a song by a 1980s band. I was quite proud of the finished piece and gave it to my English teacher, who helped me edit it and improve it. I became enamored of the whole process and decided then and there that what I really wanted to do when I grew up was be a writer.

Question 2
What is the earliest work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

When I was in high school, I wrote for the school’s newspaper. My first published piece was an interview of the drama teacher, in which we talked about the upcoming spring musical. All I remember of that experience was that I was incredibly nervous and the teacher ended up spoon-feeding me more than half of my questions during the interview because I couldn’t think of anything interesting to ask him about.

Question 3
Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?

I honestly don’t think I was inspired by any authors to write. I mean, I had favorite authors—JRR Tolkien, CS Lewis, and JM Barrie—but none of them really inspired me to write. They more inspired me to love books and the written word and story-telling, which I suppose are necessary traits for a writer to have.

Question 4
Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?

My two biggest influences right now are Jim Butcher and Diana Gabaldon. Butcher’s main character, Harry Dresden, and my own main character, Riley O’Rourke, could be twins—fraternal twins—separated at birth. They both have a very snarky, sarcastic sense of humor. Plus, Butcher writes about the Fae and it’s always very cool to read other people’s interpretations of them.
Gabaldon’s characters are just so real. They all have flaws that one might come across in a real person; they’re all driven by passions and base needs and that just amazes me. I can only hope to ever have half as much ability to write REAL characters.

Question 5
Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

I’ve been posting some real-life settings on my Facebook account that will show up in my books. One is of a wintery garden that I’ve decided is part of the Winter Faerie Queen’s castle, and the other is of a small cottage in the middle of Edinburgh’s Prince’s Street Gardens, where a major character from my next book will eventually live. I also have a bunch of photos that I’ve taken around Tucson that also show up in my books.

Question 6
Which was the first book you published and why?

My first published book is entitled Faerie Tales, and it’s the first because I’ve been living with the main character in my head for eleven or twelve years and I figured that it was high time I got her out of my head and into the hands of interested readers.

Question 7
Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

I haven’t really had any negative reaction to my work. I’ve received some three-star reviews that pointed out some weak points that will have to be corrected in the next two books, but no one has really said anything bad about my writing. There is one comment—from a friend, actually—that said she’d be surprised if a lawsuit doesn’t come out of my book, because I mention Dungeons and Dragons in it. That really, really stung.

Question 8
Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?

Gabrielle Giffords, one of Arizona’s former US Representatives, who was shot in the head during a public meeting with some of her constituents. Malala Yousafzai, the young Pakistani girl who was also shot in the head because she was very outspoken about womens’ and girls’ right to education. They both are simply amazingly brave and strong, and they inspire me every day.

Question 9
If you could go back in time to learn the truth about one historical mystery or disputed event what would it be?

I’d love to find out, once and for all, who Jack the Ripper was. I’ve read so many different opinions and seen so many different movies and TV shows about it and none of them agree. I’d really like to know for certain. I’d also like to know just how he got away with keeping his identity secret for so long!

Fiona Skye, Thank You very much!

Author Interview with John Holt

John Holt author The Kammersee Affair by John Holt

I was born in 1943 in Bishops Stortford, Hertfordshire. I currently live in Essex with my wife, Margaret, and my daughter Elizabeth. And not forgetting Missy, the cat who adopted us, and considered that we were worthy enough to live with her. For many years I was a Chartered Surveyor in local government. I was a Senior Project Manager with the Greater London Council from 1971 until it was closed down in 1986. I then set up my own surveying practice, retiring in 2008.

I suppose like many others I had always thought how good it would be to write a novel, but I could never think of a good enough plot. My first novel, “The Kammersee Affair”, published in 2006, was inspired by a holiday in the Austrian lake district. We were staying in Grundlsee. The next lake, Toplitzsee, was used by the German Navy during the war to test rockets, and torpedoes. As the war came to an end many items were hidden in the lake – millions of UK pounds, and US dollars, in counterfeit currency; jewellery stolen from the holocaust victims; and weapons. There were also rumours of gold bullion being hidden in that lake. Despite extensive searches the gold was never found. In my book, however, it is found, only in the next lake, Kammersee.

The books that followed, The Mackenzie File, The Marinski Affair, and Epidemic, all feature Tom Kendall, a down to earth private detective, and were originally published by Raider Publishing in New York. My fifth book, A Killing In The City, another featuring Tom Kendall, was originally published by Night Publishing. In August 2012 I decided to go down the self published route, and formed my own publishing brand PHOENIX. All five novels have now been published on PHOENIX. A sixth novel “The Thackery Journal” was published on 8 August 2013.

I am currently working on two other novels featuring Tom Kendall, and I have made a tentative start on an Adventure novel.

John Holt’s Books

The Marinski Affair

The Marinski Affair began as a dull mundane case involving a missing husband. Okay, so he was a rich missing husband, but he was nonetheless, still only a missing husband. The case soon developed into one involving robbery, kidnapping, blackmail and murder. But was there really a kidnapping? And exactly who is blackmailing who? Who actually carried out the robbery? Who committed the murders? Who can you trust? Who can you believe? Is anyone actually telling the truth? What have they got to hide? And what connection was there with a jewel theft that occurred four years previously? All is not as it seems. Tom Kendall, private detective, had the task of solving the mystery. He was usually pretty good at solving puzzles, but this one was different, somehow. It wasn’t that he didn’t have any of the pieces. Oh no, he wasn’t short of clues. It was just that none of the pieces seemed to fit together.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Marinski-Affair-ebook/dp/B00AFW98D8
http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Marinski-Affair-ebook/dp/B00AFW98D8

A Killing In The City

‘To make a killing in the City’ is a phrase often used within the financial world, to indicate making a large profit on investments, or through dealings on the stock market – the bigger the profit, the bigger the killing. However, Tom Kendall, a private detective, on holiday in London, has a different kind of killing in mind when he hears about the death of one of his fellow passengers who travelled with him on the plane from Miami. It was suicide apparently, a simple overdose of prescribed tablets. Kendall immediately offers his help to Scotland Yard. He is shocked when he is told his services will not be required. They can manage perfectly well without him, thank you.

http://www.amazon.com/Killing-In-The-City-ebook/dp/B0093N363S
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Killing-In-The-City-ebook/dp/B0093N363S

The Kammersee Affair

The lake was flat and calm, with barely a ripple. Its dark waters glistening, reflecting the moonlight, as though it were a mirror. Fritz Marschall knew that neither he, nor his friend, should really have been there. They, like many others before them, had been attracted to the lake by the many rumors that had been circulating. He thought of the endless stories there had been, of treasures sunken in, or buried around the lake. He recalled the stories of the lake being used to develop torpedoes and rockets during the war. Looking out across the dark water, he wondered what secrets were hidden beneath the surface.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Kammersee-Affair-ebook/dp/B009LHE1E4
http://www.amazon.com/The-Kammersee-Affair-ebook/dp/B009LHE1E4

Epidemic

Tom Kendall, a down to earth private detective, is asked to investigate the death of a young newspaper reporter. The evidence shows quite clearly that it was an accident: a simple, dreadful accident. That is the finding of the coroner and the local police. Furthermore, there were two witnesses. They saw the whole thing. But was it an accident, or was it something more sinister? Against a backdrop of a viral epidemic slowly spreading from Central America, a simple case soon places Kendall up against one of the largest drug companies in the country.

http://www.amazon.com/Epidemic-ebook/dp/B00BS9AIH2
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Epidemic-ebook/dp/B00BS9AIH2

The Thackery Journal

On the night of April 14th 1865 President Abraham Lincoln was attending a performance at The Ford Theatre, in Washington. A single shot fired by John Wilkes Booth hit the President in the back of the head. He slumped to the floor, and died a few hours later without recovering consciousness. Was Booth a lone assassin? Or was he part of a wider conspiracy? What if Booth had merely been a willing party to a plot to replace Lincoln with General Ulysees S. Grant. Let us suppose that Booth had been set up by a group of men, a group of Lincoln’s own Army Generals; Generals who had wanted Ulysees S Grant for their President, and not Lincoln. And let us also suppose that the funding for the assassination had come from gold stolen by the Confederate Army.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Thackery-Journal-ebook/dp/B00EFALJCE
http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Thackery-Journal-ebook/dp/B00EFALJCE

The Mackenzie Dossier

Kendall could just see the television screen. There was a photograph of Governor Frank Reynolds. Across the bottom of the screen the ticker tape announced in large black letters ‘Governor Reynolds Murdered’. The voice over was filling in whatever detail was available. Apparently his body had been discovered earlier that morning. He had been found lying in his garage. He had been shot twice. One shot to the upper chest, the other hitting his shoulder. ‘Police believe that the weapon used was a 38 mm caliber revolver,’ the reporter said. Kendall froze. Anthony Shaw had also been killed by a 38 mm bullet. Kendall was not quite sure of what it all meant. What connection was there between Anthony Shaw, and the State Governor, and the business mogul, Ian Duncan? And what about Senator Mackenzie? Where did he fit in? And who or what was Latimer? Only a short while ago Kendall was a small time private detective, a Private Eye, investigating an insignificant little murder with no clues, no witnesses, and no motive. In fact, no nothing. Now he had so many pieces of a puzzle he didn’t know how they fitted together. He didn’t even know if they all came from the same puzzle.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Mackenzie-Dossier-ebook/dp/B008U6STIQ
http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Mackenzie-Dossier-ebook/dp/B008U6STIQ

International Giveaway

The winner will be announced at the end of the tour.
For a chance to win one of three e-books by John Holt (winners choice) and one paperback by John Holt (winners choice)
click
a Rafflecopter giveaway

John Holt, Thank You very much!

Author Interview with Karina Kantas

We bid a warm welcome to Karina Kantas

Karina Kantas author Books by Karina Kantas

With my love for rock music and S.E.Hinton’s YA novels, it’s no surprise my first novel was in the motor-cycle fiction genre. In fact, my following novels are also urban thrillers. But those that have read my short story collection Heads & Tales and UNDRESSED know I’m not just a “one genre” author.

Born in the midlands UK, I grew up in a poor, rough area of town and used my writing to escape an unsettling reality. Delving deep into my characters’ minds and hearts, I give my readers thought provoking and sometimes dark story-lines.

I have over thirty publications including book reviews, film reviews, poetry and articles.

Nominated top ten of female authors of biker fiction, my horror story Crossed, also won the first prize in an International Short Story contest. And my books have received raving reviews.

With an International fan base, you can find me on popular network sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Myspace, where I’m only too happy to interact with my readers.

No matter what genre of fiction I write, you’ll always hear loud rock music playing while I work, as it allows me to fade away and become one with my characters.

Don’t except happy endings in my novels as I write about real life. What you will get, is exciting story-lines that will have you glued to the pages and eager for more.

I live on the beautiful Island of Corfu with my Greek husband and two daughters.

Titles to date:-

In Times of Violence
Huntress
Lawless Justice
Heads & Tales: short story collection
Undressed
Road Rage
Stone Cold: YA supernatural thriller.

Printed:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?type=Print+Products&keyWords=Karina+Kantas
E-books:
https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/karinakantas
Facebook fan page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Karina-Kantas/31754864225
Twitter:
https://twitter.com/karinakantas

Karina Kantas – Interview with Grey Wolf

1. How long have you been writing?

I have been writing since high school but I wasn’t published until twenty years ago.

2. What is the earliest work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

In Times of Violence was my first novel. I wrote it as a short story when I was 18. My first publication was a film review of the horror film Constantine.

3. Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?

S.E.HINTON inspired me to publish my first book. Music, especially rock music, inspires me to continue to write.

4. Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?

I love it when I hear of an Indie author (independent) become a huge success and doing it alone.

5. Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

Life inspires me. Meeting new people and learning of their stories.

6. Which was the first book you published and why?

After reading The Outsiders by S.E.Hinton I knew I wanted to write my own rebel fiction. So I started work on In Times of Violence which is still my number one best seller.

7. Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

Only from other authors, not from normal public readers.

8. Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?

Nelson Mandela. RIP

9. If you could go back in time to learn the truth about one historical mystery or disputed event what would it be?

Which came first the chicken or the egg!

Karina Kantas, Thank You very much!

Author Interview with Andrew Scorah

We bid a warm welcome to Andrew Scorah

 author

I was born in Doncaster, South Yorkshire but moved to Swansea, Wales in 1999. my writing has appeared in Action Pulse Pounding Tales vols 1 & 2 alongside best selling thriller authors Matt Hilton, Stephen Leather, Adrian Magson, Zoe Sharpe and Joe McCoubrey. Having been raised on a diet of seventies and eighties Pulp Fiction, and no I do not mean the film, books like The Destroyer series, Mac Bolan, et al, I’ve intended my work to reflect those humble beginnings of my literary journey. My books are not the long drawn out War and Peace length tomes, and I make no apologies for this. I write pure escapist fiction for the general entertainment of the mass audiences, brain candy. Books that will take you out of the mundane everydayness of your life into a world of pulse pounding action and adventure, just like the old Pulp stories from back in the day.

Yes there is violence, sometimes extreme, yes there is bad language, and slang, but the worlds my characters inhabit, this can be the norm. Some people will love them, some will not, it is the way the world revolves, different strokes for different folks. All you need to do is sit back buckle up and enjoy the wild roller-coaster ride, then at the end you can get off and re-join your life. Do not read too much into them, they’re just for fun.

All my books can be found here on my Amazon profiles-
AMAZON UK http://goo.gl/zU3sjX
AMAZON.COM http://goo.gl/Qf5zf1

Andrew Scorah – Interview with Grey Wolf

1. How long have you been writing?

Thanks for having me in for a chat, I first dabbled with writing stories in my youth, but that’s all it was. It has always been a dream of mine since those days, a couple of years ago, 2011 I decided to have another shot at writing stories.

2. What is the earliest work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

I dabbled with poetry as well as stories when I started out; my first published book on Amazon was a poetry book, titled A Collection in Time back in early 2012. I had posted the poems on the site Writers Cafe, and all had received great reviews. It was at this time I discovered Amazons KDP so I decided to take the plunge and publish.

3. Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?

My earliest inspirations were the likes of David Morrel, Eric Van Lustbader, Warren Murphy, and Richard Sapir who wrote The Destroyer series of books, Stephen King, Robert Ludlum to name just a few.

4. Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?

David Morrel continues to inspire, I’m now Facebook friends with him and have had many conversations with him about writing, wonderful invention this internet thing. Others who inspire me are the likes of Stephen Leather, who I am also friends with, Matt Hilton who helped me reach a wider audience when he accepted a short story of mine for an anthology he was putting together.

5. Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

I can’t say I am really but I came across a place called Camp Hero, a disused air force base in Montauk, there are several wild stories surrounding this location which fired my imagination, my short story, The Beast, available on Amazon, takes place here, Camp Hero also appears in Jericho Blues, also available from Amazon.

6. Which was the first book you published and why?

I’ve already answered this earlier. The next book I published was Eastern Fury and Other Tales featuring my character Chihiro Kitagawa, from the short story featured in Action Pulse Pounding Tales vol as compiled by Matt Hilton. The initial tale was about a Ninja warrior travelling to America in the 1800s’ in search of a renegade warrior who was wanted for murder back in Japan. A bit like David Carradines Kung Fu on steroids.

7. Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

No, we can never please everyone, and I will never try too, you love my stories or you don’t.

8. Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?

My heroes are those who strive to get by day by day, despite debilitating illnesses, or those who through no fault of their own have experienced violence at the hands of a partner and have managed to escape and make something of their lives.

9. If you could go back in time to learn the truth about one historical mystery or disputed event what would it be?

For me that would be the crash at Roswell, I’d hideout nearby just before the event to see what actually crashed there.

Andrew Scorah, Thank You very much!

Author Interview with Michael Mechant

We bid a warm welcome to Michael Mechant, erotica author.
Best selling author Michael Mechant uses his imagination to give the characters in his stories a much more interesting life than his own. Read along as he explores the limits of erotica by telling stories with a healthy dose of explicit sex.

Find him on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/michael.mechant.1
His books can be found here:

Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/Michael-Mechant/e/B008EIVCPW/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_17?qid=1387342655&sr=8-17

Barnes & Noble
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/c/michael-mechant

Kobo Books
http://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/Search?query=Michael%20Mechant&fcsearchfield=Author

Smashwords
http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/MichaelMechant

iTunes
https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/michael-mechant/id543188094?mt=11

Sony Reader Store
https://ebookstore.sony.com/search?keyword=Michael+Mechant

Michael Mechaant, author Take Jennifer Instead

Michael Mechant – Interview with Grey Wolf

1. How long have you been writing?

I started writing as Michael Mechant in June of 2012. I have been writing fiction under other names since 2004.

2. What is the earliest work of yours that you have published or intend to publish?

My first title was Her Friend’s Boyfriend.

3. Who were the earliest authors to be an inspiration for your writing?

I was inspired by Nick Scipio and Lynn Mixon.

4. Which other authors do you consider to be an inspiration and for what reason?

Nick’s Summer Camp series caught my attention because it was so well written. Later, I worked with Nick as a proofreader and learned from him before I started writing.

5. Are you inspired by any landscapes or buildings, or even towns and cities?

Not really, though sometimes things I see have inspired some of my stories. Mostly, inspiration comes from seeing people doing things, or from pictures.

6. Which was the first book you published and why?

My first book was Her Friend’s Boyfriend. I wanted to write erotica, and this story was inspired by some things I saw two couples doing at a hotel on a vacation. The women were letting their boyfriends pull their bikinis out of the way to expose them from the balcony of their room. Eventually, the manager threw them out of the hotel. I wondered what was going on behind the scenes and wrote about what I imagined they were doing.

7. Have you been surprised by a negative reaction to any of your work?

Yes, I have. Mostly, this comes from people who don’t want to read erotica. I don’t understand why people seek out and attack works they have no intention of reading.

8. Other than authors (and friends and family) who are your heroes?

I admire John F. Kennedy. He was assassinated when I was very young and I wonder how he would have changed the world even more if he had lived.

9. If you could go back in time to learn the truth about one historical mystery or disputed event what would it be?

The John F. Kennedy assassination.

Michael Mechant, Thank You very much!